The Slight Edge

Slightedge

The Slight Edge

Goodmorning Fabulous readers,
Last night I spent 1 hour reading a book called ‘Slight edge’.
I recommend it highly -it’s just a few pounds if you buy the kindle or eVersion of it.

The slight edge in a nutshell can be summarised as- if you have ever been successful at anything, look at what you did to be successful, repeat those steps and you WILL KEEP BEING SUCCESSFUL!!! It is that simple!
No mystery!
No catch!

I felt this was really relevant to healthcare professionals involved in helping people lead healthy lives and lose weight.

I support several women and men in my weight loss/healthy lifestyle program.
I teach my ladies (and gents!) this:

You have lost weight.
What did you do to lose weight?
What food choices did you make?
What type and amount of exercise did you do?

Just keep repeating the same steps and YOU WILL KEEP LOSING WEIGHT!!

No mystery nor magic!
Just continuing the same steps.
Repeat it today and tomorrow and the next….
In other words make it a lifestyle 👊
Have a fabulous day friends❤️

Dr Adaeze Ifezulike

ps: Are you are struggling with your weight or have weight related medical conditions such as Hypertension, Diabetes, Arthritis, Metabolic syndrome? Get in touch today!!  I want to help you. Health is Wealth!

DAMAGE LIMITATION PACKAGE: Happy HEALTHY Holidays 2015!

Gift of health

Its that season when we all feel merry and light. The season to party and rejoice with friends and family.

But you have to admit that no matter how into ‘healthy lifestyle’ you are, chances are that this is one time of year you kinda slip up or slack off a bit…

You will have ‘weight gain’ and ‘hangovers’ to worry about… unless you have a DAMAGE CONTROL plan to keep things in check.

Well, my friend Jon has come up with this brilliant DAMAGE LIMITATION PACK for you to control the damage you are likely to cause your body, during this festive season.

As another friend Tyler puts it, this package will ensure you “feel on top form everyday and you can still get into your little black dress or feel good to go again with the family or the lads on a night out.”


The Damage Limitation Pack Explained.

The ESSENTIALS – Your Multi-Vitamin/Mineral/Antioxidant combination of the highest quality. This plugs up EVERY nutritional gap your food contains especially at this time as we eat energy dense but nutrient poor foods. (Worth ÂŁ42.50) Everyone should be on the Essentials as a baseline for optimal nutrition.

essentials

BIOMEGA – Simply Pure Fish Oil and the best there is. Most say they check for mercury, but that doesn’t mean they take it out. These guys do.

It’s the best anti-inflammatory you can take; it turns on your fat burning hormones, turns off your fat storage hormones.

Its superb for: healthy joints, brain development, skin, hair, nail and eye. It also supports arterial function and blood flow AND there’s some Vitamin D in there as well which we seriously lack over the winter months. (worth ÂŁ22)

fish oil

HEPASIL – If you like a drink, THIS is the supplement for you. (worth ÂŁ32)

This is your Liver Detox. Everything you consume, everything, goes via the liver for removal of toxins. This can cause your liver to be overworked and stressed if you’re not consistently eating the right things causing all sorts of damage, from poor sleep, mood, weight gain, fatigue, illness and much more.

An unstable liver that isn’t functioning properly because of a build up of toxins (poor foods and alcohol) could cause a wide variety of long term health issues.

hepasil

PROBIOTICS – Outstanding support for gut health containing the ‘good bacteria’ your body needs for proper digestion plus improved immunity. (worth ÂŁ25)

probiotic

DIGESTIVE ENZYME – Absolutely necessary considering the digestive assault you are about to put yourself through in the coming weeks! This will take care of your bloating and feelings of fullness or bloating after eating. (worth ÂŁ30)

digestive enzyme

So, if you would like to purchase this pack, for yourself or someone else, I’ve arranged an awesome discount for you. It would normally cost you ÂŁ151.50 but now………..ÂŁ136.50

(that’s JUST ÂŁ4.55 a day)

SHIPPING IS FREE if you take up this offer anytime up til the 1st of January 2016!

You know you’re gonna splash out this xmas.

Doesn’t it make sense to divert some of that money towards something that could do you GOOD rather than HARM?

If you would like to take advantage of this Offer, please send me a private inbox message.

Alternatively click on each image to take you straight to the store to buy the items you want.

GIVE YOURSELF AND YOUR LOVED ONES THE GIFT OF HEALTH …

gift of health 2

Merry Christmas and a Fabulous new year from the Sexual Wellbeing Network!!

Top Ten Women health issues

imageWe’ve come a long way since 1995–and it is time to celebrate women and their achievements. But it is also time to take stock of how women’s rights are fulfilled in the world –especially the right to health. Twenty years after countries signed pledges in the 1995 Beijing Declaration and Platform of Action, women still face many health problems and we must re-commit to addressing them.

Here are ten of the main issues regarding women’s health that keep me awake at night:

Cancer: Two of the most common cancers affecting women are breast and cervical cancers. Detecting both these cancers early is key to keeping women alive and healthy. The latest global figures show that around half a million women die from cervical cancer and half a million from breast cancer each year. The vast majority of these deaths occur in low and middle income countries where screening, prevention and treatment are almost non-existent, and where vaccination against human papilloma virus needs to take hold.

Reproductive health: Sexual and reproductive health problems are responsible for one third of health issues for women between the ages of 15 and 44 years. Unsafe sex is a major risk factor – particularly among women and girls in developing countries. This is why it is so important to get services to the 222 million women who aren’t getting the contraception services they need.

Maternal health: Many women are now benefitting from massive improvements in care during pregnancy and childbirth introduced in the last century. But those benefits do not extend everywhere and in 2013, almost 300 000 women died from complications in pregnancy and childbirth. Most of these deaths could have been prevented, had access to family planning and to some quite basic services been in place.

HIV: Three decades into the AIDS epidemic, it is young women who bear the brunt of new HIV infections. Too many young women still struggle to protect themselves against sexual transmission of HIV and to get the treatment they require. This also leaves them particularly vulnerable to tuberculosis – one of the leading causes of death in low-income countries of women 20–59 years.

Sexually transmitted infections: I’ve already mentioned the importance of protecting against HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection (the world’s most common STI). But it is also vital to do a better job of preventing and treating diseases like gonorrhoea, chlamydia and syphilis. Untreated syphilis is responsible for more than 200,000 stillbirths and early foetal deaths every year, and for the deaths of over 90 000 newborns.

Violence against women: Women can be subject to a range of different forms of violence, but physical and sexual violence – either by a partner or someone else – is particularly invidious. Today, one in three women under 50 has experienced physical and/or sexual violence by a partner, or non-partner sexual violence – violence which affects their physical and mental health in the short and long-term. It’s important for health workers to be alert to violence so they can help prevent it, as well as provide support to people who experience it.

Mental health: Evidence suggests that women are more prone than men to experience anxiety, depression, and somatic complaints – physical symptoms that cannot be explained medically. Depression is the most common mental health problem for women and suicide a leading cause of death for women under 60. Helping sensitise women to mental health issues, and giving them the confidence to seek assistance, is vital.

Noncommunicable diseases: In 2012, some 4.7 million women died from noncommunicable diseases before they reached the age of 70 —most of them in low- and middle-income countries. They died as a result of road traffic accidents, harmful use of tobacco, abuse of alcohol, drugs and substances, and obesity — more than 50% of women are overweight in Europe and the Americas. Helping girls and women adopt healthy lifestyles early on is key to a long and healthy life.

Being young: Adolescent girls face a number of sexual and reproductive health challenges: STIs, HIV, and pregnancy. About 13 million adolescent girls (under 20) give birth every year. Complications from those pregnancies and childbirth are a leading cause of death for those young mothers. Many suffer the consequences of unsafe abortion.

Getting older: Having often worked in the home, older women may have fewer pensions and benefits, less access to health care and social services than their male counterparts. Combine the greater risk of poverty with other conditions of old age, like dementia, and older women also have a higher risk of abuse and generally, poor health.

When I lie awake thinking of women and their health globally, I remind myself: the world has made a lot of progress in recent years. We know more, and we are getting better at applying our knowledge. At providing young girls a good start in life.

And there has been an upsurge in high-level political will – evidenced most recently in the United Nations Secretary-General’s Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health. Use of services, especially those for sexual and reproductive health, has increased in some countries. Two important factors that influence women’s health – namely, school enrolment rates for girls and greater political participation of women – have risen in many parts of the world.

But we are not there yet. In 2015, in too many countries, “women’s empowerment” remains a pipedream – little more than a rhetorical flourish added to a politician’s speech. Too many women are still missing out on the opportunity to get educated, support themselves, and obtain the health services they need, when they need them.

That’s why WHO is working so hard to strengthen health systems and ensure that countries have robust financing systems and sufficient numbers of well-trained, motivated health workers. That’s why WHO, with UN and world partners, are coming together at the UN Commission on Status of Women from 9-20 March 2015 in New York. We will look again at pledges made in the 1995 Beijing Declaration and Platform of Action with a view to renewing the global effort to remove the inequalities that put decent health services beyond so many women’s reach.

And that is why WHO and its partners are developing a new global strategy for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health, and working to enshrine the health of women in the post 2015 United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. This means not only setting targets and indicators, but catalysing commitments in terms of policy, financing and action, to ensure that the future will bring health to all women and girls – whoever they are, wherever they live.

Dr Flavia Bustreo, Assistant Director General for Family, Women’s and Children’s Health through the Life-course, World Health Organization,

Register for the Afrocaribbean health event here http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/celebration-of-afro-caribbean-health-wellness-registration-16119556026
-99% of attendees felt the Afrocaribbean health event was worthwhile and met their specific needs.

My drinking determines my sexual health!

I nearly jumped out of my skin when I went to use one of the hospital bathrooms while on duty and as I opened the door, a voice screamed out ‘Cant someone have some peace here?’
 
I summoned the courage to open the door wider and found a young lady sprawled on the toilet floor obviously too drunk to realise she was in a public toilet and not in her own bedroom.
Poor thing!
With the help of security, she was escorted to her own house.
 
Research show that our young people continue to drink alcohol excesively.
Alcohol excess blurs the lines between responsible behaviour and what is not responsible behaviour. Many young people engage in reckless and risky sexual behaviour under the influence of alcohol.One of the major fall-out of this is the rise in the incidence of unplanned pregnancies and teenage pregnancies.
 
Unplanned and teenage pregnancies can result in disruption to social, mental and academic wellbeing of young people. Sexually transmitted infections (STI) like Chlamydia and HIV are also possible consequences of risky sexual behaviour.
 
All sexually active young children should be encouraged to delay sexual intercourse until they are much older and in committed relationships. But if this advise falls on deaf ears, it is important that contraception is available for young people to use.
 
Barrier type contraceptions like condoms used carefully can prevent transmission of STIs and also prevent pregnancy.
Contraceptions that need to be remembered such as condoms, daily pills or weekly patches can easily be ommited in the heat of passion. As a result, I strongly advocate the use of reversible long acting contraceptions such as the implants or coils for young people.
My book ‘Understanding contraception’ was written to explain the concept of contraception in a way any young person above the age of 14 years can understand.
 understanng contraception214
You can get it by clicking here for your young people as an eBook or to get the hard copy, click here. They will find the illustrations and jokes very engaging while learning about the different contraceptions and how they work.
 
I believe that equiping our young children with information does not make them promiscuous but rather protects them from easily avoidable mistakes.
 

If you would like to hear more, feel free to subscribe to our newsletter here

 
Adaeze

ABC of the ‘3 parent baby’ technology.

3 parent baby, sexual wellbeing, The world reacted with horror when the news of the ‘3 parent baby’ was approved in UK Parliament last week making the UK the very first country to authorise this.

It is understandable that there would be such a reaction. People distrust science when it comes to reproduction. It was the same reaction with In vitro fertilization (IVF) yet today so many families have benefited from it. The success of IVF now means that many couples who otherwise would be childless can now enjoy the bliss of having their own babies.

Now science has moved on to ‘3 parent baby.’

However I want to explain the so called ‘3 parent baby’ in a way non-medical people can understand. This is not science playing God at all.

But first some terminologies:3 parent baby, sexual wellbeing network

Mitochondrial diseases: The mitochondrion is the”power house” of the cell. It produces the energy required by our cells to function effectively. It also helps the body detoxify waste products amongst many other functions.

It is because the Mitochondria are such an important part of our cells that when they malfunction, it causes a whole range of diseases known as Mitochondrial Disorders.

Some disorders related to malfunction of the Mitochondria include Blindness, Autism, Diabetes, Myopathy (muscle problems), Bipolar disorder, Dementia, Epilepsy, Stroke, Parkinson’s disease and many others.

Many of these diseases are passed on from mother to her child because the child gets its mitochondria from the mother. So if the mum passes on defective mitochondria, the child will then be affected by these mitochondrial diseases.

So how does the 3 parent baby work??

Mitochondrial donation means that those with defective Mitochondria can get a good one from donors.

The baby still has the entire DNA from its own father.

It still has the entire DNA from its own mother.

However the defective Mitochondria from the biological mum are replaced with functioning Mitochondria from a donor. This donor Mitochondria make up only about 0.1% of the total DNA in the baby.

I have simplified the process to help readers understand. Details about the procedure can be read in medical articles such as here.

So, do these donated mitochondria mean that the child has 3 parents??

If you got a kidney from a donor, does that make the donor one of your parents??

So we can see that the term ‘3 parent baby’ does not really mean what it says and is simply creating fear and mistrust in the public.

However this is a new technology and long term studies will be needed to ensure that it is safe just like studies are needed and are ongoing concerning IVF babies and many other scientific breakthroughs. We just do not know for now how safe Mitochondrial donation is even though the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has suggested that the technique is “not unsafe.”

You can read why one scientist opposes mitochondrial donation here.

But for now it looks like a major breakthrough which hopefully might  alleviate and even eliminate mitochondrial diseases and the suffering and anguish of families affected by them.


Dr Adaeze Ifezulike is a Family Physician/GP based in Aberdeen. She is a Finalist at the UK Sexual Health Awards 2015 and for her book ‘Understanding Contraception: A guide for black ladies’ she has been nominated ‘Author of the Year’ at the Women4Africa Awards.

A must-watch film for young women (and men!)

BBC Murdered by my boyfriend, sexual wellbeing networkI had an incredible relaxing Christmas period and I hope you did too.
A major feature of my holiday was just sitting back with family to catch up on family favourites like the very Scottish ‘Brave‘ and the lovely ‘Frozen‘.
I even managed to watch the Christmas edition of East Enders :-), caught a bit of the Queen’s Christmas speech and watched Strictly Come Dancing Christmas special. 
I must say I enjoyed ‘Gone Girl‘ though mystery and murder are not usually my thing.
I could feel the stress of hospital work oozing out of me and all my systems melting into relaxation as we ate and lounged about with friends and family.
But there was one film that had me sitting upright.
Its the BBC true life story ‘Murdered by my boyfriend‘.
If you are a woman between the ages of 13 and 50, I would strongly recommend that you watch this film.
All mothers of teenage children should sit down with their kids and watch this.
If you are not yet in a relationship or just entering one, this is the must-watch film before you commit.
If you are a man reading this, please watch this film.
I dont want to give away much: you really need to click below and start watching now.
Please leave your comments below. We learn from each other.
Here’s to a beautiful New year!
If you need more information on domestic violence please visit this site for help.

A note for teenage girls.

Teenagers, youth, sex education, teenage mothers, education.

Please share with every young girl you know.

Lets give our girls back their youth.
Young girls should enjoy their teenage years without being ladled with ‘adult matters.’

I am often saddened when a teenager walks into my consulting room requesting an abortion or suffering from depression as a result of boy/girl/relationship traumas.

Lets encourage our girls to aspire to more in life.
Motivate them to get a good education.
Inspire them to aim for more and not settle for a life of regrets and ‘I wish I had listened.’

Please click the share button and make a difference. Thanks.

Afrocaribbean Health and Wellness Team: Improving health in the black community.

Afrocaribbean Health, HIV, Fountain of love church, Health friendly

The Parliamentary Ethnicity and Health report of 2007 shows that Black and minority ethnic (BME) groups generally have worse health than the overall population. For instance, it reports that there is up to 7 times higher rates of new diagnosis of psychosis among Black Caribbean people than among the White British. Health Survey for England 2004 reports a prevalence of Hypertension of more than 38% in Black Carribean males compared to the general population prevalence of 31%.The prevalence of doctor-diagnosed Diabetes amongst Africans and Caribbean men above 55 years combined is 15% compared to the general population prevalence of 4.3%.HIV prevalence for black Africans in the UK is 37 per 1000 population, compared to 1.5 per 1000 of the rest of the population and people from African communities are more likely to test and be diagnosed later than other groups. These are a few instances of the dismal health statistics available about the afrocaribbean ethnic group.

Why is this the case?

There are many reasons given for this picture. These include distrust and unfamiliarity with the way the health sector works, language barriers, stress related to poverty, immigration issues, unemployment, poor housing amongst other factors. Poverty may mean that many eat unhealthy but cheap food which then adversely affects their health. Stigma from society and media can limit access to health services.

What can be done?

The Afrocaribbean Health and Wellness Team (AHWT) has taken the bull by the horn to try and address these areas of health inequality. This unique group is made up of health professionals, members of the voluntary sector and other people with the following objectives:

  • To raise awareness of health related issues affecting the Afro-Caribbean communities in Scotland.

  • To empower Afro-Caribbeans to make informed choices about their health.

  • To inform Afro- Caribbeans about health support services and agencies available in the community.

To be able to bridge the health inequality, we found it necessary to liaise with Faith group leaders as worship is an integral aspect of the afrocaribbean community. It is the belief of the AHWT that for health interventions to make an impact within any group, strategies must align to the beliefs and practices of that group.AIDS and Mobility Europe recommends that policy, prevention, treatment and care for migrants should include ”targeted, culturally appropriate services and communication with migrant communities.”

 

What we did:

We carried out a health survey at the Fountain of Love church, Aberdeen to ascertain what health issues the members of the Faith group wanted to learn more about. A total of 212 people participated in the survey 59% of whom were females. 88% were members of the church, the rest had been visiting on the day of the survey. 58% of those who participated in the survey were in the 30-40 years age range.

Based on the result of the survey, a health event took place on the 25th of October at the Fountain of Love church hall. Health professionals were invited from within and outside the Afrocaribbean community to educate and inform attendees on different health topics. Topics covered included Mental Health, Cardiovascular Health, Sexual Health, Men’s Health, Getting to know your NHS and Weight Management. Speakers on the day were Dr Matthew Jack, Dr Winifred Eboh, Dr Petrus Elofuke, Dr Adaeze Ifezulike, Dr Fumen Gamba and Mr Katai Kasengele. Good interactive participation was helped by small group workshops on the various topics which were anchored by the speakers and others including Dr Jenny Bryden, Mrs Tabeth Timba-Emmanuel, Mrs Ubong Usua, Mrs Lolade Ogunrinboye and Mrs Yetunde Odebiyi.

 

More than 40 people opted for confidential testing for blood borne viruses like HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C while a further 60 had their blood sugar, Blood pressure, Fat content and Body Mass Index (BMI) measured. The testing booths were manned by Public health staff from the NHS (Penny Gillies and Helen Corrigan) and Roselie Emmanuel.

 The Atmosphere:

Sexual wellbeing network, Adaeze Ifezulike, Roselie Emmanuel, Chris Gbenle, Dupe Omotosho, Katai Kasengele, Jenny Bryden, Ubong Usua,It was fantastic as people felt at home unlike they would in a hospital environment. Their questions were answered. Food was provided by the church and visible participation by church leaders headed by Pastor Dr Chris Gbenle helped to foster trust and engagement with attendees.

The event ended with a ”HEALTH FRIENDLY’ Certificate issued to the church.

Evaluation of event:

Participants were asked to anonymously evaluate the event with a series of questions, some of which are included here:

How could the event be improved? Some answers included ”I would want to hear more about stress management, high blood pressure and mental health”, ”Create more awareness of the programme” and ”Do such programs at least every two months.”

What did you  like best about the event? ”The workshops and the screening”, ”The package was excellent” and ”All the sessions.”

What have you gained as a result of attending this event?

”A lot, I now know my weight, BMI and sugar blood test,” ”Information on weight management,” ”That its not only when you are not feeling well that you should seek advice” and ”Intensive education and awareness about HIV and other illnesses.”

What might you do differently as a result of this event?

”Change my eating and drinking habits”, ”Watch my weight,” ”Monitor my health,” ”Change diet, become more active and less lonely” and ”Eat better.”

90% of the evaluation forms handed back rated the organisation of the event as Excellent or Good.

Members of the Afrocaribbean Health and Wellness team include Dr Winifred Eboh, Dr Matthew Jack, Mrs Ubong Usua, Mrs Lolade Ogunrinboye, Mrs Tabeth Timba-Emmanuel, Mr Katai Kasengele and Dr Adaeze Ifezulike.

If you would like to know more about the afrocaribbean health events and how your organisation can achieve ‘HEALTH FRIENDLY’ status, please contact Dr Adaeze Ifezulike on info@sexualwellbeingnetwork.com

contraception, HIV, STD, Hepatitis

Nma comes to the clinic.

HIV? Me? No, I’m married! (26)

HIV, Sexual wellbeing network, Adaeze IfezulikeI saw she was booked in to see me. It was exactly a week after her husband and she had been together to see me. I was glad to see her name in the list of patients I was to see today.

“Hello Nma,” I smiled at her.

She managed a smile back. She looked a bit ill. Her eyes looked swollen as though she hadn’t slept well. I felt a twinge of guilt. Dike had kept me busy and so angry that I had completely forgotten Nma. How had she been coping? What had been going on at home? After all, she was the real victim in all this.

“How have you been?”

“Very well, thank you.”

” You don’t look very well,” I said gently, “please tell me how you have been.”

The tears slowly trickled down her face and the drops gathered momentum until they became a stream down her face.

I passed her a tissue and watched silently as she fought with her feelings.

“My husband’s job, his immigration status, his insurance…”

“What are you talking about, Nma?” I asked bewildered.

“He can’t lose all that because of me.”

“Because of you..?”

“My HIV is my problem. I must bear my burden alone and let him carry on with his life.”

So that was it. Dike had been brainwashing her, blaming her for the HIV. Making her feel that his job,immigration status and insurance would be at risk because she had HIV.
And yet he had given her HIV!

The Afrocarribean Health Event holds on 25th October at RCCG Fountain of Love Church hall, Palmerston Road, Aberdeen, Scotland. This free event is unique in that it tackles health issues that affect afrocarribeans.
Topics that will be featured include Mental Health, Hypertension and Diabetes, Sexual Health and Weight Management.
Experts on the above topics will be available to answer questions. Lunch will be provided. All adults are warmly invited.
Register for the event here.