Super Health Webinar -how to turn your health ‘switch’ on

Hello friend,

Do you want more energy?

Fed up of horrible skin?

Confused about what a healthy meal really is?

Struggling with your weight?

Wishing you had a personal physician to decode it all?

My new (free) Health Webinar is what you need!!!

In this free training session I will be teaching you:

  • Two ticking bombs to avoid in your health journey
  • Why these health bombs can stop you in your track
  • How they are the enemies of your children and family
  • How eating the wrong food makes you hungrier (and fatter!)
  • And so much more!

My simple, powerful and easy-to-implement tips will completely RESET your health.

The health webinar will be LIVE on Tuesday 4th October 8pm.

Register here for free now

The session will last approximately 35 minutes..

Click here to register for this live session now

I am going to help you ensure that you end 2016 on the perfect note health-wise.

PLUS at the end of the session you’ll also receive my FREE eBook ‘Three things that are killing our children’. If you are a parent or have a niece or nephew, you NEED to read this!

Having been a doctor for nearly 20 years, I am deeply saddened that a lot of illnesses are the result of ignorance and I am on a mission to CHANGE that.

My passion is health and this webinar is packaged to help you through the maze of conflicting information out there and help you on the road to great health.

Let’s do this!

Dr Adaeze

PS. once again, this is a LIVE session (webinar) and it will be on Tuesday 4th October at

  • 8pm GMT

Click here to register

 

What’s the BIG deal about water?

Today think ‘water, water, water’ 😃

Aim at drinking 2 litres of water at least 💪
To know the exact amount you should drink, multiply your weight by 33mls eg if you weigh 100kg then you should be drinking 3.3litres per day.

Easy to do, easy not to do 😎

Not drinking water is like using the toilet and not flushing it 🙈

Let’s do it friends and you will see your health and even your brain function improve. 👌👌

Did you know that the brain is made up of about 80% water? Now you know why you have headaches and feel disoriented and stressed/depressed and lack clarity when you are dehydrated.😴

When your brain has enough water you will be able to think faster, be more focused, and experience greater clarity and creativity.💥💥

So carry that water bottle with you everywhere 👊

And if you struggle to drink water, try taking it flavoured with bits of fruits.

Make your own home flavoured water….much healthier than chemical-filled shop ones.

I’ve had 1 litre so far (10am) so feeling pretty pleased with myself…hahaha.
What about you?

M.E.P Fit Woman

swn mep fit W

M.E.P means mentally, emotionally and physically fit woman.
At the Sexual wellbeing network, we firmly believe that women are the greatest assets of this century.
Whether a woman is a wife, mum, career woman, Vet, missionary or whatever, for her to maximise her potentials, she needs to be mentally, emotionally and physically fit.

The MEP Fit woman programs aim to encourage women to look beyond limitations and disappointments to a brighter future.
Anxiety, worry, guilt, hatred and such emotions are sometimes signs of a mentally and emotionally un-sound mind which will invariably affect one’s physical health.
Good evidence abound that a lot of physical illness have their root cause in mental and emotional imbalance within the individual.
So let go of ‘low level’ thinking such as self deprecation or under-valuing yourself and practice a ‘higher and empowering’ mental attitude that disciplines your emotions and invariably helps your physical health as well.

Watch out for a MEP Fit woman program coming to a location near you.

We have teamed up with the amazing Sunshine Mothers Club to present our next event on the 5th of September at Aberdeen.

It promises to be a life changing event, so SAVE THE DATE please 😀

More details soon!!

For enquiries, email: info@sexualwellbeingnetwork.com

 

Top Ten Women health issues

imageWe’ve come a long way since 1995–and it is time to celebrate women and their achievements. But it is also time to take stock of how women’s rights are fulfilled in the world –especially the right to health. Twenty years after countries signed pledges in the 1995 Beijing Declaration and Platform of Action, women still face many health problems and we must re-commit to addressing them.

Here are ten of the main issues regarding women’s health that keep me awake at night:

Cancer: Two of the most common cancers affecting women are breast and cervical cancers. Detecting both these cancers early is key to keeping women alive and healthy. The latest global figures show that around half a million women die from cervical cancer and half a million from breast cancer each year. The vast majority of these deaths occur in low and middle income countries where screening, prevention and treatment are almost non-existent, and where vaccination against human papilloma virus needs to take hold.

Reproductive health: Sexual and reproductive health problems are responsible for one third of health issues for women between the ages of 15 and 44 years. Unsafe sex is a major risk factor – particularly among women and girls in developing countries. This is why it is so important to get services to the 222 million women who aren’t getting the contraception services they need.

Maternal health: Many women are now benefitting from massive improvements in care during pregnancy and childbirth introduced in the last century. But those benefits do not extend everywhere and in 2013, almost 300 000 women died from complications in pregnancy and childbirth. Most of these deaths could have been prevented, had access to family planning and to some quite basic services been in place.

HIV: Three decades into the AIDS epidemic, it is young women who bear the brunt of new HIV infections. Too many young women still struggle to protect themselves against sexual transmission of HIV and to get the treatment they require. This also leaves them particularly vulnerable to tuberculosis – one of the leading causes of death in low-income countries of women 20–59 years.

Sexually transmitted infections: I’ve already mentioned the importance of protecting against HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection (the world’s most common STI). But it is also vital to do a better job of preventing and treating diseases like gonorrhoea, chlamydia and syphilis. Untreated syphilis is responsible for more than 200,000 stillbirths and early foetal deaths every year, and for the deaths of over 90 000 newborns.

Violence against women: Women can be subject to a range of different forms of violence, but physical and sexual violence – either by a partner or someone else – is particularly invidious. Today, one in three women under 50 has experienced physical and/or sexual violence by a partner, or non-partner sexual violence – violence which affects their physical and mental health in the short and long-term. It’s important for health workers to be alert to violence so they can help prevent it, as well as provide support to people who experience it.

Mental health: Evidence suggests that women are more prone than men to experience anxiety, depression, and somatic complaints – physical symptoms that cannot be explained medically. Depression is the most common mental health problem for women and suicide a leading cause of death for women under 60. Helping sensitise women to mental health issues, and giving them the confidence to seek assistance, is vital.

Noncommunicable diseases: In 2012, some 4.7 million women died from noncommunicable diseases before they reached the age of 70 —most of them in low- and middle-income countries. They died as a result of road traffic accidents, harmful use of tobacco, abuse of alcohol, drugs and substances, and obesity — more than 50% of women are overweight in Europe and the Americas. Helping girls and women adopt healthy lifestyles early on is key to a long and healthy life.

Being young: Adolescent girls face a number of sexual and reproductive health challenges: STIs, HIV, and pregnancy. About 13 million adolescent girls (under 20) give birth every year. Complications from those pregnancies and childbirth are a leading cause of death for those young mothers. Many suffer the consequences of unsafe abortion.

Getting older: Having often worked in the home, older women may have fewer pensions and benefits, less access to health care and social services than their male counterparts. Combine the greater risk of poverty with other conditions of old age, like dementia, and older women also have a higher risk of abuse and generally, poor health.

When I lie awake thinking of women and their health globally, I remind myself: the world has made a lot of progress in recent years. We know more, and we are getting better at applying our knowledge. At providing young girls a good start in life.

And there has been an upsurge in high-level political will – evidenced most recently in the United Nations Secretary-General’s Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health. Use of services, especially those for sexual and reproductive health, has increased in some countries. Two important factors that influence women’s health – namely, school enrolment rates for girls and greater political participation of women – have risen in many parts of the world.

But we are not there yet. In 2015, in too many countries, “women’s empowerment” remains a pipedream – little more than a rhetorical flourish added to a politician’s speech. Too many women are still missing out on the opportunity to get educated, support themselves, and obtain the health services they need, when they need them.

That’s why WHO is working so hard to strengthen health systems and ensure that countries have robust financing systems and sufficient numbers of well-trained, motivated health workers. That’s why WHO, with UN and world partners, are coming together at the UN Commission on Status of Women from 9-20 March 2015 in New York. We will look again at pledges made in the 1995 Beijing Declaration and Platform of Action with a view to renewing the global effort to remove the inequalities that put decent health services beyond so many women’s reach.

And that is why WHO and its partners are developing a new global strategy for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health, and working to enshrine the health of women in the post 2015 United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. This means not only setting targets and indicators, but catalysing commitments in terms of policy, financing and action, to ensure that the future will bring health to all women and girls – whoever they are, wherever they live.

Dr Flavia Bustreo, Assistant Director General for Family, Women’s and Children’s Health through the Life-course, World Health Organization,

Register for the Afrocaribbean health event here http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/celebration-of-afro-caribbean-health-wellness-registration-16119556026
-99% of attendees felt the Afrocaribbean health event was worthwhile and met their specific needs.

Did you fall down the steps all by yourself or did you have some help?

domestic abuse, sexual wellbeing networkShe came with her husband. He was the epitome of attentiveness, supporting her as she limped along, quick to perform her every wish.
She was covered in bruises.

I asked her how she came about her bruises.
‘Oh I fell down the steps.’
Really! I thought a bit skeptically.
As I listened to her story and observed the husband’s attentiveness, I was already plotting.
I must do all I can to get this man out of the room.

I wanted to ask her woman-to woman if she fell down the steps all by herself or had some help.
I marvelled that I have become a sceptic.
I now see domestic abuse everywhere.
But who wouldnt??

Here are some Domestic violence statistics for you from the Domestic violence Statistics website:
Every 9 seconds in the US a woman is assaulted or beaten.
Around the world, at least one in every three women has been beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused during her lifetime. Most often, the abuser is a member of her own family.
Domestic violence is the leading cause of injury to women—more than car accidents, muggings, and rapes combined.
Studies suggest that up to 10 million children witness some form of domestic violence annually.
Nearly 1 in 5 teenage girls who have been in a relationship said a boyfriend threatened violence or self-harm if presented with a breakup.
Everyday in the US, more than three women are murdered by their husbands or boyfriends.

We need to do more as a society to STOP Domestic Violence. No woman/man desrves to be sent to an early grave due to domestic violence.

Victims please speak up. The silence is a major factor that keeps the abuse going.
And when these victims speak, society must be ready to believe them, support them and protect them.

~Adaeze Ifezulike


Amazon review of ‘Understanding Contraception: a guide for black ladies’

”I Enjoyed reading this book very much, found it humorous, with the right amount of factual information and the examples given made it real and easy to understand various issues. The illustrations complimented the text, overall an educational book that is easy to read and understand”

Get your copy here.

Register for the 2015 Afrocaribbean Health Events here

Afrocaribbean Health and Wellness Team: Improving health in the black community.

Afrocaribbean Health, HIV, Fountain of love church, Health friendly

The Parliamentary Ethnicity and Health report of 2007 shows that Black and minority ethnic (BME) groups generally have worse health than the overall population. For instance, it reports that there is up to 7 times higher rates of new diagnosis of psychosis among Black Caribbean people than among the White British. Health Survey for England 2004 reports a prevalence of Hypertension of more than 38% in Black Carribean males compared to the general population prevalence of 31%.The prevalence of doctor-diagnosed Diabetes amongst Africans and Caribbean men above 55 years combined is 15% compared to the general population prevalence of 4.3%.HIV prevalence for black Africans in the UK is 37 per 1000 population, compared to 1.5 per 1000 of the rest of the population and people from African communities are more likely to test and be diagnosed later than other groups. These are a few instances of the dismal health statistics available about the afrocaribbean ethnic group.

Why is this the case?

There are many reasons given for this picture. These include distrust and unfamiliarity with the way the health sector works, language barriers, stress related to poverty, immigration issues, unemployment, poor housing amongst other factors. Poverty may mean that many eat unhealthy but cheap food which then adversely affects their health. Stigma from society and media can limit access to health services.

What can be done?

The Afrocaribbean Health and Wellness Team (AHWT) has taken the bull by the horn to try and address these areas of health inequality. This unique group is made up of health professionals, members of the voluntary sector and other people with the following objectives:

  • To raise awareness of health related issues affecting the Afro-Caribbean communities in Scotland.

  • To empower Afro-Caribbeans to make informed choices about their health.

  • To inform Afro- Caribbeans about health support services and agencies available in the community.

To be able to bridge the health inequality, we found it necessary to liaise with Faith group leaders as worship is an integral aspect of the afrocaribbean community. It is the belief of the AHWT that for health interventions to make an impact within any group, strategies must align to the beliefs and practices of that group.AIDS and Mobility Europe recommends that policy, prevention, treatment and care for migrants should include ”targeted, culturally appropriate services and communication with migrant communities.”

 

What we did:

We carried out a health survey at the Fountain of Love church, Aberdeen to ascertain what health issues the members of the Faith group wanted to learn more about. A total of 212 people participated in the survey 59% of whom were females. 88% were members of the church, the rest had been visiting on the day of the survey. 58% of those who participated in the survey were in the 30-40 years age range.

Based on the result of the survey, a health event took place on the 25th of October at the Fountain of Love church hall. Health professionals were invited from within and outside the Afrocaribbean community to educate and inform attendees on different health topics. Topics covered included Mental Health, Cardiovascular Health, Sexual Health, Men’s Health, Getting to know your NHS and Weight Management. Speakers on the day were Dr Matthew Jack, Dr Winifred Eboh, Dr Petrus Elofuke, Dr Adaeze Ifezulike, Dr Fumen Gamba and Mr Katai Kasengele. Good interactive participation was helped by small group workshops on the various topics which were anchored by the speakers and others including Dr Jenny Bryden, Mrs Tabeth Timba-Emmanuel, Mrs Ubong Usua, Mrs Lolade Ogunrinboye and Mrs Yetunde Odebiyi.

 

More than 40 people opted for confidential testing for blood borne viruses like HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C while a further 60 had their blood sugar, Blood pressure, Fat content and Body Mass Index (BMI) measured. The testing booths were manned by Public health staff from the NHS (Penny Gillies and Helen Corrigan) and Roselie Emmanuel.

 The Atmosphere:

Sexual wellbeing network, Adaeze Ifezulike, Roselie Emmanuel, Chris Gbenle, Dupe Omotosho, Katai Kasengele, Jenny Bryden, Ubong Usua,It was fantastic as people felt at home unlike they would in a hospital environment. Their questions were answered. Food was provided by the church and visible participation by church leaders headed by Pastor Dr Chris Gbenle helped to foster trust and engagement with attendees.

The event ended with a ”HEALTH FRIENDLY’ Certificate issued to the church.

Evaluation of event:

Participants were asked to anonymously evaluate the event with a series of questions, some of which are included here:

How could the event be improved? Some answers included ”I would want to hear more about stress management, high blood pressure and mental health”, ”Create more awareness of the programme” and ”Do such programs at least every two months.”

What did you  like best about the event? ”The workshops and the screening”, ”The package was excellent” and ”All the sessions.”

What have you gained as a result of attending this event?

”A lot, I now know my weight, BMI and sugar blood test,” ”Information on weight management,” ”That its not only when you are not feeling well that you should seek advice” and ”Intensive education and awareness about HIV and other illnesses.”

What might you do differently as a result of this event?

”Change my eating and drinking habits”, ”Watch my weight,” ”Monitor my health,” ”Change diet, become more active and less lonely” and ”Eat better.”

90% of the evaluation forms handed back rated the organisation of the event as Excellent or Good.

Members of the Afrocaribbean Health and Wellness team include Dr Winifred Eboh, Dr Matthew Jack, Mrs Ubong Usua, Mrs Lolade Ogunrinboye, Mrs Tabeth Timba-Emmanuel, Mr Katai Kasengele and Dr Adaeze Ifezulike.

If you would like to know more about the afrocaribbean health events and how your organisation can achieve ‘HEALTH FRIENDLY’ status, please contact Dr Adaeze Ifezulike on info@sexualwellbeingnetwork.com

contraception, HIV, STD, Hepatitis

A doctor’s life.

HIV? Me? No, I’m married! (23)

HIV, women health,contraception, abortion, rapeBy the thirty-sixth patient, I was exhausted but happy.

‘What a hard life a doctor’s life is,’ I mused as I bit into my nearly stale sandwich which I didn’t get to eat at lunch time because I was running late.

I could feel a mild headache at my temples which I always get when I am dehydrated.

‘Keep hydrated,’ I said to myself like I would say to my patients. ‘Doctor, practice what you preach!’

Ten minutes are provided for each patient: but how do you rush an elderly woman whose sole social engagement of the week is coming to see me?

Many patients like to tell me where they have been to in Africa. They might take a full two minutes trying to recall the places they have visited with the hope that I might recognise one of the places.
Lagos, Warri, Johannesburgh are the commom ones. And it is lovely chatting with them. But that usually leaves eight minutes or less for the actual consultation. It would be no problem except of course there is usually a list of things each patient wants me to sort out in the little time left…

I jumped as the receptionist knocked and popped her head round the door.

‘Are you free to speak to Mr Dike? He has been on the phone six times today. Says he really needs to speak to you.’

This is what I wanted to say: ‘Tell him to go away and never come back. Tell him that if he phones to ask for me, I will report him to the police for harassment. Tell him I have no business with him or his family.’

But all I said to the receptionist was: ‘Okay. Put him through.’

The Afrocarribean Health Event holds on 25th October at RCCG Fountain of Love Church hall, Palmerston Road, Aberdeen, Scotland. This free event is unique in that it tackles health issues that affect afrocarribeans.
Topics that will be featured include Mental Health, Hypertension and Diabetes, Sexual Health and Weight Management.
Experts on the above topics will be available to answer questions. Lunch will be provided. All adults are warmly invited.
Register for the event here.

 

HIV? Me?

HIV? Me? No, I’m married! (22)

contraception, HIV, black women healthIt was just a short walk from my car into the surgery but the weather was so windy and wet that my dainty umbrella was useless in all that ferocity. I got a bit wet.

As I hurried into the surgery, the receptionist called out to me.

‘Dr Ezii,a gentleman called and left a message for you.’

‘Oh? Who was it?’ I asked as I took the mail out of my pigeonhole and hurriedly scanned through it.

‘A man named Dike.’

‘What the…’ I bit my lips to stop the swear word that had risen to my mouth, smiled my thanks to the receptionist and made my way to my consulting room. I was burning with anger.

It had been two days since the event with Dike. I thought I had managed to erase the bad taste the whole thing had left in my mouth.

I was still disgusted with myself over my cowardice at the doctors’ meeting. How could I have chickened out like that? What shameful diffidence!

What did he want now? How dare he even try to see me? Perhaps he was coming to apologise? Well, stuff his apology!
I immediately got into the business of the day. I had 36 patients to see with a paltry fifteen minutes break after the first eighteen. I had no time to waste on Dike and his family.

The Afrocarribean Health Event holds on 25th October at RCCG Fountain of Love Church hall, Palmerston Road, Aberdeen, Scotland. This free event is unique in that it tackles health issues that affect afrocarribeans.
Topics that will be featured include Mental Health, Hypertension and Diabetes, Sexual Health and Weight Management.
Experts on the above topics will be available to answer questions. Lunch will be provided. All adults are warmly invited.
Register for the event here.

 

 

 

The policy on violence.

HIV? Me? No, I’m married (21)

HIV, Black women's health, contraception, Understanding contraception: a guide for black ladiesI sat through the doctors’ weekly meeting like a zombie. I barely heard what was going on.

I nodded when someone spoke to me and smiled at my colleagues. All I could think of was what had happened an hour ago in my consulting room.

I felt anger building up again as I thought about what Dike had done. How dare he overturn my table!

I recalled his vehemence and how frightened I had been. I knew the NHS policy on violence towards staff – surely this ticked all the boxes? This was more than enough to show him the door. He would be de-registered immediately.

His details would be passed to the big bosses at the Community Health Partnership (CHP) and it would be recorded in his notes that he was a violent man and a threat to health professionals.

Those notes would follow him like his shadow wherever he might go to register. They would follow him forever.

They would be an invisible mark that nothing could erase.

I was jolted out of my reverie as the senior partner went round the table asking for ‘any other business’.

Each colleague shook his head. I squirmed with impatience, willing them to hurry up and get to me. I had something to say. I had a story to tell.

“Dr Ezii anything else?” He inquired as he got to me.

I took a few deep breaths. This was my moment. It was payback time and I was going to enjoy every moment of it.

‘No, nothing else,’ I heard myself saying. ‘Nothing to add.’

 

The Afrocarribean Health Event holds on 25th October at RCCG Fountain of Love Church hall, Palmerston Road, Aberdeen, Scotland. This free event is unique in that it tackles health issues that affect afrocarribeans.
Topics that will be featured include Mental Health, Hypertension and Diabetes, Sexual Health and Weight Management.
Experts on the above topics will be available to answer questions. Lunch will be provided. All adults are warmly invited.
Register for the event here.